Seeking, Listening and Meaning Making

Efforts to decolonize academic research and scholarship must consider how to engage with Indigenous peoples in a meaningful way.  Researchers must continue to dismantle the structures that allowed for research on Indigenous people and develop Indigenous-centred practices that allow for research with and by Indigenous peoples and communities.

Research Chairs

Kim Anderson
Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Relationships and Associate Professor, Family Relations
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences

Jesse Popp
Ontario Agricultural College Chair in Indigenous Environmental Science
School of Environmental Sciences, Ontario Agriculture College


Faculty Working with Indigenous Peoples and Communities 

To view more about the research and work our faculty are doing with Indigenous communities, please visit their faculty webpage by selecting their name from the list below.

Kim Anderson
Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Relationships and Associate Professor, Family Relations
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences

Associate Professor, Family Relations
College of Social and Applied Human Science
 
Assisant Professor, Department of Management 
Gordon S. Lang School of Buisness and Economics
 
Associate Professor, Department of Integrative Biology
College of Biological Science
 
Program Head, Psychology
University of Guelph Humber 
 
Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
 
Professor & McCain Family Chair in Food Security, Department of Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics
Ontario Agricultural College
 
Associate Professor, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development 
Ontario Agriculture College
 
Associate Professor, Engineering 
College of Engineering and Physical Sciences 
 
Associate Professor, History
College of Arts
Professor, Political Science
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
 
Professor, Engineering 
College of Engineering and Physical Sciences 
 
Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
 
Associate Professor, Geography, Environment & Geomatics
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
 
Jesse Popp
Ontario Agricultural College Chair in Indigenous Environmental Science
School of Environmental Sciences, Ontario Agriculture College
 
Associate Professor, Geography, Environment & Geomatics
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
 
Associate Professor, Geography, Environment & Geomatics
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences
 
Associate Professor, Sociology and Anthropology
College of Social and Applied Human Sciences

Graduate Student Opportunities

Indigenous Graduate Scholarships

The Indigenous Graduate Scholarships were established to encourage Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, Métis) students to pursue graduate studies in any discipline. Students entering or registered in any program who self-identify as Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, Métis) with at least a first-class (A-) average in the most recently completed two years of academic study. In-course students beyond semester level 3 as of the scholarship application deadline are ineligible to apply. More information can be found at the Graduate & Postdoctoral Studies website.

Indigenous Mentorship Network of Ontario

Indigenous Mentorship Network of Ontario (IMN-Ontario) is a five-year health training program to provide Indigenous scholars and trainees with high quality mentorship, training, and opportunities to engage in Indigenous health and well-being research.The IMN-Ontario hosts webinars to share knowledge, advice and best practices; networking events; opportunities for research and publications; and funding opportunities for Indigenous students. 

Kim Anderson is the Co-Investigator from the University of Guelph.  More information can be found at the Indigenous Mentorship Network Program website.


Select Highlights

Collaborative Research Projects and Reports 

All My Relations Cluster, Live Work Well Research Centre

Led by Kim Anderson, All My Relations is the Indigenous ways of knowing cluster. Their work consists of Indigenous mentoring and networking and providing land-based learning and activities.

Collaborative Relationships Between First Nations and Municipalities in Ontario 

Many First Nations and municipalities across Ontario have formed collaborative relationships to achieve mutually beneficial outcomes, such as improved service provision, or economic development. This research aims to explore factors influencing why these types of relationships emerge in some situations and not others. U of G faculty Sheri Longboat and Brady Deaton are co-investigators on this project.

Our Indigenous World – Office of Research

A publication from the Office of Research highlighting Indigenous research.

We Stand Strong in Our Knowledge

Report on seeking meaningful entry points to Indigenous language revitalization at the University of Guelph.

Conservation through Reconciliation Partnership

The Conservation Through Reconciliation Partnership (CRP) represents a seven-year program of work hosted by the IISAAK OLAM Foundation, the Indigenous Leadership Initiative, and the University of Guelph. This project includes many U of G faculty including Principle Investigator Robin Roth, Faisal Moola, Noella Gray, Andrea Breen, Jennifer Silver, Anna Stanley and Jeji Varghese.
 

 

Nokom's House

Nokom's House will be a "grandmother centered" space for research, community engagement, land-based activities and ceremony, built in the U of G Arboretum. This site will encompass gardens, a sacred fire, ceremonial grounds and a granny's cabin/research hub where visiting, cooking, creative work and retreat activity can take place.  Dr. Kim Anderson (Family Relations and Applied Nutrition), Dr. Sheri Longboat (Rural Planning and Development) and Dr. Brittany Luby (History) are the driving force behind Nokom's House.

 

Manomin Research

Learn more about Dr. Brittany Luby's (History) research on the factors affecting manomin growth in the Niisaachewan Anishinaabe Nation territory. This research takes place both on the land as well as at the University of Guelph.

 

Recent Publications 

Anderson, Kim, & Jamie Cidro. 2020. Because We Love Our Communities: Indigenous Women Talk About Their Experiences as Community-Based Health Researchers. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 24(2), 3-17.
 
Danto, David, Walsh, Russ. & Jocelyn Sommerfeld. 2020. Learning from Those Who Do: Land-Based Healing in a Mushkegowuk Community. International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11469-020-00306-z
 
Luby, Brittany. 2020. Dammed. The Politics of Loss and Survival in Anishinaabe Territory. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press.
 
MacDonald, David. 2019. The Sleeping Giant Awakens: Genocide, Indian Residential and the Challenge of Conciliation. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
 
Marshall, Rachael, Michele Desjardine, Jana Levison, Kim Anderson, & Edward McBean. 2020. Moving towards Effective First Nations’ Source Water Protection: Barriers, Opportunities, and a Framework. Water, 12(2). https://doi.org/10.3390/w12112957
 
Moola, Faisal & Robin Roth. 2019. Moving beyond Colonial ConservationMmodels: Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas offer hope for Biodiversity and Advancing Reconciliation in the Canadian Boreal Forest. Environmental Review, 27(2).
 
Naylor, Jamie, Brady James Deaton, and Alan Ker. 2019.  2020. Assessing the effect of Food Retail Subsidies on the Price of Food in Remote Indigenous Communities in Canada. Food Policy, 93: 1-7.
 
Nuxnuxskaca, & Sáwllkwa, & Montilla, Natali & Tad McIlwraith. 2019. “Doctors and Professors Aren't the Professors of the Land”: Reflections on the Interconnected Environment with Splatsin Elder Nuxnuxskaca Cts'e7i7elt. Collaborative Anthropologies, 11. 1-25. 10.1353/cla.2019.0006.
 
Pavel, Ciprian, & Ruben Burga. 2020. Opportunities for Information and Communication Technology Development in Remote Northern Ontario Indigenous Communities in Spite of COVID-19 Physical Restrictions. Journal of Indigenous Social Development, 9(3): 76-91. 
 
Popp, Jesse, Priadka, Pauline, Young, Megan, Koch, Kevin, and James Morgan. 2020. Indigenous Guardianship and Moose (Alces alces):  Weaving Indigenous and Western Approaches. Human Wildlife Interactions. 14:296–308.
 
Reed, Graeme, Brunet, Nicolas D., Longboat, Sheri, & David C. Natcher. 2020. Are Indigenous Guardians an emerging approach to Indigenous environmental governance? Conservation Biologyhttps://doi.org/10.1111/cobi.13532  
 
Varghese, Jeji & Stephen Crawford. 2020. A cultural framework for Indigenous, Local, and Science Knowledge Systems in Ecology and Natural Resource Management. Ecological Monographs. https://doi.org/10.1002/ecm.1431.
 
von der Porten, Suzanne, Lepofsky, Dana, McGregor, Deborah, & Jennifer Silver. 2016. Recommendations for marine herring policy in Canada: Aligning with asserted Indigenous legal and inherent rights. Marine Policy, 74: 68-76.
 
Wilson, Shawn, Breen, Andrea, & Lindsay DuPré. (Eds.) 2019. Research and Reconciliation: Unsettling Ways of Knowing through Indigenous Relationships. Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

Resources

First Nations Principles of Ownership, Control, Access and Possession (OCAP)

USAI Research Framework – Utility, Self-voicing, Access, Inter-relationality

CARE Indigenous Data Governance Principles - Collective Benefit, Authority to Control, Responsibility, Ethics

Tri-Council Policy Statement 2 - Chapter 9: Research Involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada

Negotiating Research Relationships: A Guide For Communities

U of G Research Ethics Board Application supplement III - Cross Cultural Research